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Watch: The Outspoken Generation — Children Of LGBT Parents Speak Out

by David Badash on July 13, 2013

in families,News

Post image for Watch: The Outspoken Generation — Children Of LGBT Parents Speak Out

This new, heartwarming video of children raised by LGBT parents features Zach Wahls and Ella Robinson, Co-Chairs of the Family Equality Council‘s Outspoken Generation program.

Wahls, who is just 21-years old (22 on July 15!) garnered nation attention in January of 2011 when he spoke before the Iowa House Judiciary Committee in support of his lesbian parents and against a proposed constitutional amendment that would have banned same-sex marriage. A video of his speech went viral.

Ella Robinson is the daughter of Bishop Gene Robinson, the first priest to enter into a same-sex marriage consecrated by the Episcopal Church.

The Family Equality Council’s Outspoken Generation program “empowers young adults with LGBT parents to speak out about our community’s families,” and “are speaking out, dispelling myths and misinformation about their families, and changing the national dialogue about family values.”

The Family Equality Council writes:

When Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote his landmark opinion in Windsor V. United States, a critical tenet of his opinion was that the voices of the children of LGBT parents should be considered in the marriage debate.

For several years, opponents of marriage equality have built their movement on the argument that loving, committed couples must be denied marriage because of a fictional harm to children. Their rallying cry became “children deserve a mother and a father” and it has been used as a basis to deny equality to the millions of families with LGBT parents raising children. In the recent Supreme Court cases, the voices of these children provided direct evidence to the contrary. In fact, the kids are indeed alright, and the nation is starting to hear what they have to say about their families.

Nothing speaks louder than the simple truth of the day-to-day lives of these young people and the parents who have raised them.

There is no better argument for treating all families, including theirs, with the dignity respect and they deserve, and the full equality under the law that is theirs by right.

Watch, enjoy, share:

 

 

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{ 2 comments }

sdfrenchie July 13, 2013 at 10:06 pm

Two of my best friends live in Texas and last year went to New York to be married – one of the mates was from Brooklyn. The New Yorker had a daughter who lived with the two men as she was growing up. She was a sweet, loving girl and had no difficulty having a two-male parental unit.

I don't know the mother's position in all this and I never really wanted to stick my nose in that deeply to their affairs. But the daughter was so lovely and loved all her parents' gay friends. She was very much against gay couples cheating on each other, too.

Today, this girl is married and has children of her own. Her gay fathers are always welcome in their home. She wouldn't have it any other way.

Diogenes_Arktos July 29, 2013 at 12:03 pm

"Ella Robinson is the daughter of Bishop Gene Robinson, the first priest to enter into a same-sex marriage consecrated by the Episcopal Church."

Not exactly. The use of "consecrated" is too strong. In its canon law, TEC does *not* (yet) recognize same-sex marriage. It does offer a rite of blessing for same-sex couples, which may be used with permission of the diocesan bishop regardless of the civil marital status of the couple. There are diocesan bishops who do allow their priests as agents of the state to perform this rite as both the civil marriage its religious blessing.

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